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Curriculum & Assessment

NCEA vs other systems: the downside of picking sides

The 10th anniversary of NCEA reveals there is still division in the ranks, with many elite schools offering alternative options for students.

Curriculum, the culprit?

SHANE KENNEDY discusses why he believes rhetoric is masking poor education in New Zealand.

Reliability of National Standards assessments called into question

A recent report has cast doubts over the reliability of teachers’ National Standards assessments and rises in student achievement.

The primary years – NZC, Cambridge or IB?

While the vast majority of New Zealand primary schools follow The New Zealand Curriculum, a small number favour the International Baccalaureate’s Primary Years Programme or the Cambridge International Primary Programme. Here, proponents of each system discuss the relative merits and weaknesses.

The big debate: should Te reo be compulsory in our schools?

JUDE BARBACK looks at the arguments for and against making te reo Māori compulsory in New Zealand schools.

Phonics is the big debate

AGAINST: Victoria University of Wellington and the University of Otago. FOR: Massey University.

Building digital technology into the curriculum: master stroke or missed opportunity?

While the news that digital technologies is to be included in The New Zealand Curriculum has been broadly welcomed, many believe the announcement falls short in a number of ways. By JUDE BARBACK.

The write path to remedial spelling

The campaigner, the Ministry, and the schools. JUDE BARBACK considers the different stances when it comes to addressing remedial spelling in schools.

Is our main goal really to produce a generation of good spellers?

JAMES THOMLINSON, aka 'Mr T' discusses how the way writing is assessed forces teachers to put too much emphasis on aspects like spelling and punctuation.

What will national standards look like post-election

This year’s election is about to hove into view and it’s time once more to consider everybody’s pitch. National Standards is a flagship government policy that’s very much on the line, with the controversy and opposition to its introduction nearly a decade ago refusing to go away. JAYLAN BOYLE considers again some of the main objections and invites Labour’s Chris Hipkins to discuss his version of a post-National Standards world.
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