Secondary

Sectors

  • pathway start feet

    Overhaul of careers system announced

    The government today announced changes to New Zealand's careers sector that will support students to think about their tertiary education and future employment earlier.

  • EDR supplement 2014 cover

    Sector Voices: the biggest challenge facing education

    We asked prominent people from within the sector what they perceived to be the biggest challenge currently facing New Zealand education. Here is what they had to say.

  • maori reading kids

    Decile system review on the cards

    Following the release of the latest decile ratings, Minister of Education Hekia Parata has confirmed her intentions to review the 25-year old decile system.

  • Well Ed Logo

    Birth of #WellyED

    On the back of the success of educators’ forum #edchatNZ, another new venture has begun: the Wellington connected educators’ group, #WellyED.

  • NZ flag

    Addressing equity gap emerging as biggest challenge for NZ education

    A New Zealand Education Review supplement that discusses the biggest challenges currently facing New Zealand education shows that many sector leaders are most concerned about the widening equity gap and the effect it is having on student achievement.

  • teacher smiling

    Top teachers recognised

    Five outstanding New Zealand teachers have been recognised at the 2014 ASG National Excellence in Teaching Awards (NEiTA).                                           

  • blackboard money tree

    Schools are informed of new deciles

    The Ministry of Education has begun informing schools of the latest recalculation of school decile ratings, with all schools expected to know their new decile by 20th November.

  • awards ceremony

    2015 Prime Minister's Education Excellence Awards launched

    *Education Minister Hekia Parata has launched the 2015 Prime Minister’s Education Excellence Awards, which recognise and celebrate excellence in teaching, leadership, community engagement and governance.*

  • hands up classroom

    Linwood College hits back at criticism

    Earlier this year it was making news for becoming New Zealand’s first science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM)-focused school, but this week Linwood College is in the media for all the wrong reasons.

  • maori reading kids

    NZEI’s online tool strengthens division over IES

    Primary teachers’ union the NZEI Te Riu Roa has released a new online tool that allows schools to compare benefits of the Government’s $359 million Investing in Educational Success (IES) policy with other options, such as more resourcing for teacher aides and smaller classes.

  • teen guy grass

    Opinion - hazing: the underbelly of an otherwise excellent education

    My husband attended a prestigious boys’ boarding school in England. I attended a co-ed secondary state school in the Waikato. It is no perhaps no surprise we have fairly different views on “hazing”, the practice whereby older students administer punishments or ritualised initiation challenges for younger students.

  • tablet desk

    N4L connects 1000th school to Managed Network

    Over 1000 schools have now been connected to Network4Learning’s Managed Network, which means more than 40 per cent of New Zealand schools are now using N4L’s services, which include fast and reliable internet connectivity, uncapped data, web filtering and network security.

  • computers adults

    More schools dive into the Pond

    *Network for Learning (N4L) has revealed some new features to its digital learning hub, Pond, today at the annual ULearn conference in Rotorua.*

  • blackboard money tree

    Needs-based vs outcome-based school funding

    The contentious issue of school funding is on the agenda of the Post Primary Teachers’ Association’s annual conference, currently underway in Wellington.

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    Class size debate continues

    STEVE THOMAS continues the debate about Labour’s class size policy, clarifies some of the issues around education funding and class sizes, and raises new questions.

  • Murray Sherwin

    A different kind of education revolution

    The Innovation Partnership wants to see training for teachers on how to teach in modern classrooms and appropriate teaching methods to go alongside investment in digital technologies because devices alone can’t achieve better educational outcomes. MURRAY SHERWIN argues the case.

  • principal

    Secondary principals to vote on changes to IES policy

    The PPTA’s Secondary Principals’ Council and Secondary Principals’ Association will vote on an interim agreement that introduces some key changes to the Government’s Investing in Educational Success (IES) initiative.

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    Opinion: Class size debate – what Labour’s policy means

    PPTA president ANGELA ROBERTS asserts that there has been a lot of misunderstanding about Labour’s class size policy announcement from the 'experts' and commentariat.

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    Opinion: More teachers and smaller classes won’t mean more learning

    The Government’s proposed Investing in Educational Success scheme has been debated in detail. Now, academic STEVE THOMAS takes a critical look at Labour’s proposed education sector funding in the lead up to the election.

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    Opinion: Fully fund state schools – abolish school donations

    Associate Professor JOHN CLARK from Massey University’s Institute of Education suggests the Government has lost sight of free education and that there are more appropriate methods than parent donations to fund schools.

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    Opinion: Realising the future of education

    Deputy Principal at Hobsonville Point Secondary School, CLAIRE AMOS looks at why change is needed in New Zealand’s education system, what needs to change, and how to manage this change.

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    Opinion: IES – from crude proposal to detailed policy

    Post Primary Teachers' Association (PPTA) President ANGELA ROBERTS outlines what has changed with the Government’s proposed Investing in Educational Success policy since the announcement was made in January, and why the sector should support it.

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    Opinion: Is IES a solution to the ‘achievement challenge’?

    Massey University Associate Professor JOHN CLARK takes a closer look at the proposed Investing in Educational Success (IES) initiative and finds the problems it hopes to solve to be more complex than IES can manage.

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    From tweeting to meeting

    Members of a Twitter network for New Zealand educators, #edchatNZ, are preparing to meet face-to-face at the inaugural #edchatNZ conference in Auckland. Registrations have opened for the event, which will take place at the new Hobsonville Point Secondary School in Auckland over the 8-9th of August this year.

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    Opinion: Excellence shared or spread too thin?

    Yesterday's announcement was a masterstroke by Prime Minister John Key's National Government. It refocussed the education debate on positive action, raising student achievement, giving teachers and principals something more to which to aspire, and most importantly, addressing the need to spread quality teaching more evenly across deciles and regions. But will the initiative work?

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    Education a major player in Budget 2014

    Education featured prominently in Budget 2014, with Education Minister Hekia Parata announcing new spending of $858 million over four years and the remainder of this year.

June 2017

  • gender

    The "Kardashian effect": in defence of single-gender education

    In New Zealand, single-gender education is a choice parents can make – not a common scenario in comparable state education systems. As the debate continues to burn in the US, JAYLAN BOYLE talks to two principals of single-gender schools about why they believe their school environment is a force for good – both cite reasons that might not be immediately obvious. 

April 2017

February 2017

October 2016

  • John B

    University Entrance: always a bridesmaid?

    DR JOHN BOEREBOOM says University Entrance (UE) has always been the bridesmaid of the New Zealand secondary school qualifications. In this article he questions whether the present requirements for entry into universities are fair and valid.

  • Wolf in sheeps clothing

    NCEA pass rate targets: a wolf in sheep’s clothing?

    DR JOHN BOEREBOOM says the increasing pass rates are masking concerns around the quality of the mix of achievement standards taken by different students to achieve NCEA.  

August 2016

  • Bring your own 02

    Bring your own approach

    As it becomes increasingly necessary for students to have access to a digital device, each school must find a way to provide access that best suits its learners and its community. As JUDE BARBACK discovers, there is no single best approach, but many factors to consider, not least cost and digital equality.

  • wifi at school

    How to get the most out of BYOD? get infrastructure sorted

    New Zealand’s largest school, Rangitoto College demonstrates the importance of having a robust Wi-Fi infrastructure in place before rolling out a BYOD programme so that students can use their devices to maximise learning opportunities in and outside the classroom.

June 2016

  • Communities of Learning

    Communities of Learning “game-changing”

    JUDE BARBACK looks at two established Communities of Learning and finds enthusiasm and optimism for the new initiative is overriding some of the earlier negativity surrounding the controversial IES policy.

February 2016

October 2014

June 2014

May 2014

March 2014

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    NZ Government’s new education policy

    JUDE BARBACK looks at sector reaction to the Government’s proposal to introduce new roles to help lift student achievement.

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    School Power!

    Education Review finds out how a new AoG contract could help lower schools’ energy bills.

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    Flipped learning in Kiwi classrooms

    With internet access nearly within every student’s grasp, the focus shifts from getting a device in every student’s hands, to what to do with it once it’s there. Flipped learning is one option that is proving popular throughout the world. Education Review examines the flipped classroom.

  • NZ flag

    Curriculum, the culprit?

    SHANE KENNEDY discusses why he believes rhetoric is masking poor education in New Zealand.

  • Preparing-for-Buddy-Day-at-Te-Akau-ki-Papamoa-School-2.JPG

    Bringing the child abuse conversation into the classroom

    JUDE BARBACK looks at the collaborative approach between schools, communities, police, CYF, the Ministry and child advocacy organisations to help ensure students are safe at school and at home.

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    Second language immersion

    French teacher STEPHEN GRIMWOOD shares the “excitement, learning, confusion, and chaos” of his five-week Language Immersion Award in Provence.

  • hands up classroom

    The charter school, the state school and the union

    JUDE BARBACK looks at the mounting tensions in Northland as PPTA members enforce their ban on teaching students from the new partnership school.

  • UK-relief-teacher-451986861.jpg

    A day in the life of a UK relief teacher

    With work proving difficult to come by in New Zealand, CHRISTIAN BRIENESSE, a history and English teacher from Dunedin, sought teaching and travelling opportunities in the UK.

December 2013

  • Jude.gif

    ED's Letter

    Since news of the Roast Busters scandal broke, there have been new threads emerging on an almost daily basis. Anguish and criticism has spilled over onto the police, radio talkshow hosts, and schools. But people’s disgust is generally directed at the handful of deplorable young men at the heart of this story.

  • Boys-behaving.jpg

    Boys behaving badly?

    This year, the annual ‘undie run’ at Tauranga Boys’ College took an ugly turn, prompting a letter bemoaning the recent bad behaviour of boys in general. Principal Robert Mangan’s response below gives an insight into the complex and multi-faceted process of turning boys into fine young men.

  • Teachers-Council.jpg

    Sun sets on Teachers Council

    With the new Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand set to replace the New Zealand Teachers Council next year, teachers are anxious that their new independent statutory professional body truly is independent. JUDE BARBACK looks at how things are evolving.

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    The Novopay nightmare – when will it end?

    The Ministry of Education’s troubled payroll system is allegedly on the mend, but at what cost? JUDE BARBACK reflects on Novopay’s painful journey so far.

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    Venturing into un’charter’ed territory

    The opposition to charter schools intensifies with the announcement of the first five partnership schools in New Zealand. JUDE BARBACK weighs up the arguments as the new schools prepare to open their doors.

  • Acronyms.jpg

    Acronyms of opportunity

    UFB, BYOD, N4L, SNUP – techy acronyms are littering the education world, but each brings exciting new elements of change and innovation to teaching and learning in New Zealand schools.

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    The teacher supply and demand see-saw

    JUDE BARBACK reviews the tricky business of managing teacher supply and demand.

  • Deciles.jpg

    Rethinking deciles

    Despite unrest around the current school decile system, the Ministry of Education says there are no plans yet for a formal review. JUDE BARBACK considers what’s in a number.

November 2013

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    Increasing number of schools take up AoG contracts

    Last year, Education Review looked at the fledgling AoG contracts for schools and noted the lack of buy-in. One year on, the tide appears to be changing, with more and more schools opting for AoG contracts. JUDE BARBACK looks at the ongoing work of the MBIE to increase schools’ awareness and dispel common misconceptions about the contracts.

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    Modern Learning Environments and learning technologies

    CLAIRE AMOS questions whether ‘modern’ changes to the traditional classroom will really help improve students’ learning and outcomes.

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    Leading learning and change across the country

    JUDE BARBACK takes a closer look at the Learning and Change Networks initiative that is empowering New Zealand schools to raise achievement – and gaining global recognition.

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    The perils of working with incorporated societies: a cautionary tale

    Murrays Bay Intermediate principal COLIN DALE discusses the challenges that emerged when an incorporated society, designed to run a music school attached to the school, viewed its role beyond what was intended. With the matter reaching High Court, Dale’s compelling account reveals an aspect of school management that other schools should heed with caution.

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    Crying out for Chromebooks?

    With schools well-versed in the tablet vs netbook debate, Google have thrown another option into the mix. Touted as cheap, fast and functional, could Google Chromebooks be just what schools are looking for?

  • hand up classroom

    First-hand experience: a day in the life of a UK relief teacher

    With work proving difficult to come by in New Zealand, CHRISTIAN BRIENESSE, a history and English teacher from Dunedin, sought teaching and travelling opportunities in the UK.

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    PPP: behind the scenes

    Education Review asks Jason Wozniak of Aurecon about the decisions made and lessons learned from designing, building, and furnishing New Zealand’s first Public Private Partnership (PPP) schools at Hobsonville Point.

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    The Network is nigh

    JUDE BARBACK looks at why schools are in a rush to register their interest for the Network 4 Learning and what’s happening behind the scenes.

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    Privacy in the cloud

    ‘Cloud’ computing is rapidly becoming more than just another buzzword in our digital lives. The expected paradigm shift has implications for schools that are not yet fully understood, and with data integrity on everyone’s mind these days, Education Review, looks at exactly where the buck stops.

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    Take a virtual adventure: the future of school excursions

    From connecting students with subject-matter experts in Antarctica to meeting ‘face-to-face’ with other students in China, MARCI POWELL says video collaboration is breaking down the traditional boundaries of school excursions and transforming the way students learn and interact.

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    There’s no iPad in team or is there?

    Tablet devices are excellent for individual independent learning, but do they promote collaboration in the classroom? JUDE BARBACK finds out.

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    Surrender and retain

    The new Education Amendment Act will allow teachers to search and seize student devices in order to hold perpetrators of cyber bullying to account, but student privacy issues prove to be a sticky issue. By JUDE BARBACK.

September 2013

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    The Primary Years – NZC, Cambridge or IB?

    While the vast majority of New Zealand primary schools follow The New Zealand Curriculum, a small number favour the International Baccalaureate’s Primary Years Programme or the Cambridge International Primary Programme. Here, proponents of each system discuss the relative merits and weaknesses.

  • Education.jpg

    Education: Beeby’s, Tomorrow’s and Today’s

    RENEE GERLICH’s research into the history of New Zealand education reveals how various policy decisions over the years have done little to fulfil early education director Clarence Beeby’s vision of equality in education.

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    Learning about e-Learning

    JUDE BARBACK looks at an increasing number of education courses in e-learning that are aimed to help inform teachers how to use emerging technologies to deliver a “future-focused education” for their learners.

July 2013

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    The big wide world – but at what cost?

    Concerns over health and safety, increasing inequality between and within schools, financial pressure on parents, and difficulty with fundraising all create hurdles for the overseas school trip. However, many schools believe these obstacles should not stand in the way of offering their students the chance to experience the world.

January 2013

December 2012

  • NZ flag

    The Christchurch conundrum

    Mixed reactions emerge as Christchurch communities take part in consultation about the proposed education renewal plan.

  • NovoPAIN

    The Ministry of Education’s new payroll system Novopay has caused many problems for many schools. JUDE BARBACK considers whether it is one mishap too many for New Zealand education.

  • homework teen girl

    Must try harder: ERO’s report card

    Education Review Office’s evaluation report on New Zealand schools was a dose of reality to the sector. With an education system suggested to now be less-than-world-class, what is it going to take to raise student achievement to the levels required? JUD

  • boy with globe

    Charter Schools: answer to underachievement or mad experiment?

    Of all the controversial issues New Zealand’s education sector has faced this year, charter schools remain one of the most contentious. Education Review gets both sides of the story.

  • blackboard money tree

    Decile decisions

    The Education Review Office’s decision to scrap decile ratings from its school reports raises the question of the purpose and usefulness of the school decile system. JUDE BARBACK reports.

  • computers adults

    Public property: schools’ achievement

    *The decision to make National Standards results public has angered many schools and unions. But will it help lift performance as predicted?*

October 2012

  • The write path to remedial spelling

    The campaigner, the Ministry, and the schools. JUDE BARBACK considers the different stances when it comes to addressing remedial spelling in schools.

September 2012

  • Taking the international school path

    New Zealander, Justin Hardman, attended Hong Kong International School and now works there. He reflects on the international school system.

  • An international education

    JUDE BARBACK looks at some of the pros and cons of international schools.

  • League Tables: Learning from experience

    If there was a league table for international education systems, New Zealand would likely rank near the top. Will the introduction of primary school league tables see our ranking plummet?

  • Kiwi teachers abroad tell it like it is

    JUDE BARBACK asks New Zealand teachers overseas the important questions about recruitment, money, family, culture, and teaching. Recruitment agent, Lauranne Croot, also shares her views.

  • Bonjour Kiwi Teachers!

    Two New Zealand teachers and recipients of Language Immersion Awards share their different experiences in Montpellier, France.

  • A month in Argentina? Si, por favor!

    MARTIN WEREN of Hillcrest High School shares his Argentinian experience.

  • In Piaget's footsteps

    American professor Alison Gopnik is emerging as a leading light in child psychology. LAWRENCE WATT reports.

  • Secret Agent Society

    An Australian PhD study that trialled a programme to help children with Asperger’s Syndrome is fast becoming an international phenomenon.

  • Pathway of the poor

    JUDE BARBACK talks to Australian expert, Dr John Polesel, about the need for quality, structured, and well-resourced vocational education and training programmes at secondary schools.

  • From Dannevirke to dangerous minds

    Education Review talks to Kiwi teacher CAMERON ANDREW about combining teaching with travel and his eye-opening experiences teaching difficult kids in London.

February 2012

  • NZ Teacher

    Thank a teacher - Every morning, from my kitchen window, I watch school children waiting at the school bus stop near my house.

  • Finding the magic number

    Education Review delves into at what is driving the push to increase class sizes and why the education sector is so opposed.

  • A Kiwi education: what our students really think

    Education Review asks six new student leaders to reflect on their New Zealand education as they approach the end of their secondary schooling.

  • Difference in opinion:charter schools

    The New Zealand Government’s recent announcement of the new charter schools policy has met with mixed reactions. Here, two experts voice their opinions.

  • Getting the best from National Standards

    Jenny Poskitt advises teachers how to get to grips with Overall Teacher Judgments, to help them get the best out of National Standards for their students.

  • Our big bullying problem: are we getting anywhere?

    New research shows that New Zealand’s schools’ anti-bullying policies are not up to scratch. What else can we do? JUDE BARBACK confronts this uncomfortable topic.

  • Playing at parenting: Plunket’s role in our schools

    Plunket does more than provide check-ups for two-year-olds and playgroups for new mums. JUDE BARBACK looks at what Plunket is achieving through its Education in Schools programme.

  • A valued education

    Whose job is it to instil values in our young people? The family’s? The school’s? The teacher’s? Everyone’s? JUDE BARBACK spins the moral and ethical compass.

  • New teachers, listen up

    An education lecturer, a researcher and a teacher who has recently completed her first year of teaching all give their tips on what new teachers should be prepared for in 2012.

  • When “the stare” isn’t enough

    VALERIE MARGRAIN discusses the complexities of engaging with challenging behaviour in her new book, Responsive Pedagogy: Engaging Restoratively with Challenging Behaviour.

  • Hitting the right note

    CLARE HITCHCOCK shares her tried and tested top 10 tips for starting a school concert band.

  • It’ll be alright on the night

    ALAN HITCHCOCK looks at the highs and lows of putting on a school play.

  • Ms Math

    Fulbright scholar, Ngaire Addis, returned home to find she was the recipient of a prestigious national mathematics teaching award.

  • Finding middle ground

    Is our intermediate school system working? JUDE BARBACK asks why there is a growing band of support in New Zealand for middle schools, encompassing Years 7 to 10.

December 2011

  • Transportability of NCEA overseas

    How do NCEA qualifications stack up in other countries? ANGELA PEREZ of NZQA reports.

  • Are tertiary learning advisors an endangered species?

    EMMANUEL MANALO, JENNY MARSHALL and CATH FRASER discuss the benefits of investing in the provision of student learning development programmes.

  • From Southland to Santa Rosa

    KEITH FERGUSON talks to Education Review about his South American adventure.

  • Turning Japanese

    Education Review asks Japanese teacher DEBRA ATKIN about her experience in Japan.

  • Method behind the madness

    JUDE BARBACK considers whether some of the world’s more unorthodox education systems would work in New Zealand.

  • Thinking at the heart of the curriculum

    The New Zealand Curriculum requires the integration of multiple learning outcomes. CLINTON GOLDING looks to Australian curricula for answers.

  • Numbers game

    Two Fulbright Scholars are about to depart for the US to further their research into mathematics teaching.

  • Preparing global citizens

    New Zealand schools can learn from the success of Hutt International Boys’ School’s internationalisation programme. Education Review talks to DEAN RABBITT.

  • Lure of the Middle East

    JUDE BARBACK talks to one teacher about why he is joining the mass exodus to the United Arab Emirates.

  • Export education is finally centre stage

    MICHELLE WAITZMAN looks at how the new Crown agency dedicated to export education came to fruition and what it aims to achieve.

  • Global Plus

    Education Review talks to a school, a university, an ITP and a PTE about the benefits international students bring to their institution.

  • Tightening the rules

    Education Review considers the recent immigration changes aimed at strengthening export education.

  • Behind the Blogs

    GUY MANCE kept two blogs to share the personal and educational realms of his experience teaching abroad in Belgium. Education Review meets the man behind the blogs, and his family.

  • Life (and love) outside of London

    ROSIE BUCHANAN says rural England has a lot to offer New Zealand teachers: great schools, friendly people, beautiful countryside... and perhaps a little romance!

  • Kiwis in Oxford

    JUDE BARBACK talks to New Zealander FELICITY LUSK about becoming the first woman to lead a prestigious boys’ school in Oxford.

March 2010

  • teen girl classroom

    The seeds of success

    Education Review looks at a new study that focuses on the characteristics of successful Māori secondary school students

  • Apples and Pears

    League tables are a bogey for many in the school sector, but inter-school comparisons have their place, reports JOHN GERRITSEN

  • Finding the voice that fits

    Take care of the minor misbehaviour and the big stuff is less likely, says KEVIN KNIGHT

  • Staying in control

    The model of effective practice: BILL ROGERS advises a calm, non-confrontational approach to behaviour management

  • Blurring secondary-tertiary boundaries

    It’s the school that is not a school – the tertiary high school. JOHN GERRITSEN reports

  • Opportunity knocks

    The government’s Youth Opportunities suite of initiatives promises better things for young people. But could it also be the start of a sea change for secondary schooling in this country? JOHN GERRITSEN reports

  • On a collision course?

    JOHN GERRITSEN previews this year’s teacher pay talks

March 2011

  • NZ Teacher

    In-depth coverage of the big issues in the education sector for teachers, students in their final year of teacher education and education leaders. An invaluable source of information, especially for new teachers and those who mentor them!

  • Cleaning green

    Schools are getting low marks for environmental awareness in their daily maintenance.

  • Standards drama rolls out backstage

    A teacher’s guide to the Alignment of Standards project.

  • Pay packet parley

    DAVID CRAIG uses a question and answer format to review secondary school teachers’ industrial action.

  • Who’s who?

    Associations, unions and more – here’s a brief guide to the education sector.

  • Kick-start the learning engine,or use a key?

    BOB SULLO looks at options teachers have for awakening student motivation.

  • In the eye of the beholder

    ROSEMARY CATHCART has been an exponent for Gifted and Talented children for 30 years. She wonders why Māori and Pasifika students are seldom seen on that school roll.

  • What kind of teacher are you?

    How can prospective teachers choose which branch of the profession to enter?

  • Seeking the bigger debate

    PETER SIMPSON is the new president of the New Zealand Principals Federation.

  • Looking for leaders

    UNASA ENOSA AUVA’A says our diverse student population needs to be reflected at leadership level.

  • A stake in the ground

    Creating a workplace culture can drive improvements but has its challenges.

  • Tech tools and the new teacher

    Many teachers face students who seem to have better digital skills than they do, especially when it comes to the internet. Empowering students through ICT is a challenge.

  • Losing digital control

    Many teachers face students who seem to have better digital skills than they do, especially when it comes to the internet. Empowering students through ICT is a challenge.

  • From special needs

    to success for all?

  • A spade is now a spade

    GEOFF VAUSE reports on expectations now placed on providers of teacher education.